Photography with a scooter in Italy.

It’s been almost a month since I posted the blog about y experience of taking a scooter to Europe for our vacation. The post was about the general use of the scooter on our trip as it was my first real use of a scooter. At the end of the post I stated I would be posting again shortly about how the scooter affected my photography. Well, shortly has turned into a longer time as daily life got in the way. Life has finally slowed down a little, so I hope to be posting more and getting caught up. As part of that, here is the post on the scooter and my photography.

Before leaving for Europe, I didn’t get a chance to do photography while using the scooter. The second day in Rome, a group of us were going to go to St. Peter’s square to see what it was like during holy week. This would be my first real use of the scooter and doing some photography at the same time. I immediately noticed what could be a problem. If you look at many photos taken by the general public, you’ll quickly see that they generally take at a particular angle of view. The photo is most often taken from standing height, about 5 ft. to 6 ft. 6 in. for the general public. Once you get serious about photography, you realize that one of the items that make a photo interesting is showing a different Point Of View, POV. In other words, vary the height you take your photos from.

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My wife, Margaret, son, Shawn, his wife, Cara, our 2 granddaughter, Annika & Giuliana, and their 2 nephews, Giuseppe and Luca, in St. Peter’s Square.

Being in the scooter, you tend to shoot you photos from the seat you’re seated in. At first you see this as a new POV as you’re not used to shooting from this height. But I realized after a time, that I wasn’t varying my POV. I would need to get off the scooter to vary my point of view, Standing for a higher POV, kneeling for a lower. Having to do this, adds another layer of inertia. Inertia, what does inertia have to do with photography? Maybe I should provide a definition of Inertia.

Inertia, a property of matter by which it continues in its existing state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line, unless that state is changed by an external force.

As photographers, we’ve all experienced Inertia. Who hasn’t been traveling down a highway and seen a scene waiting to be photographed. But, instead of stopping the car and returning to that spot, we just continued on our journey. We then justify our not stopping by thinking it’ll be there tomorrow, the light could be better or we need to get where we are going or any of a dozen other good reasons. This was inertia, we were moving and it was just too much work stopping. It also works the other way, it’s going to be a great sunset, but there are any number of reasons to stay home rather than go out. We’ve all experienced “some form of this at least once.”

When you’re on foot, it’s easy to stop or turn around to take a photo. It’s also fairly easy to kneel down or sit down to change your POV. When you are on a scooter, you’re usually there because your legs aren’t fully functional, there is quite a bit of inertia to over come. It’s easy to just sit rather than get off the scooter to explore a better POV. I found that it was just to easy to just sit and take the photo. It’s something that I have to make sure I don’t fall into in the future.

While there are definitely drawbacks to the scooter, it is also a big positive. I can now cover much more distances than I could without it. When we were in San Quirico d’Orcia in Tuscany, it was great having the scooter to be able to get up and down the streets. I noticed that all the doors into the residences were different, but there were also similarities. I could drive up and down the street photographing the doors, though it was easy to just stay on the scooter. I’ll insert a few of the doorway photos for you to see.

I can definitely say that using the scooter provided me with an easy of mobility that I haven’t enjoyed for sometime. In fact, it was probably easier and faster for me to get around than a normal walker. I just have to overcome my own inertia and get of the scooter so that I have more of a choice of the POV I want. What I wouldn’t give to be able to walk, but having the scooter gives me back some of the mobility I’ve been missing.

Here are a few photos of the door in San Quirico d’Orcia. I photographed a couple of streets with doors and have about 40-50 different doors.

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